Original Research

Prevalence and factors associated with abdominal obesity among primary health care professional nurses in Eastern Cape, South Africa

Sizeka Monakali, Daniel Ter Goon, Eunice Seekoe, Eyitayo Omolara Owolabi
South African Family Practice | Vol 60, No 5 : September/October| a4920 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/safp.v60i5.4920 | © 2019 Sizeka Monakali, Daniel Ter Goon, Eunice Seekoe, Eyitayo Omolara Owolabi | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 25 October 2019 | Published: 23 October 2018

About the author(s)

Sizeka Monakali, University of Fort Hare, South Africa
Daniel Ter Goon, University of Fort Hare, South Africa
Eunice Seekoe, University of Fort Hare, South Africa
Eyitayo Omolara Owolabi, University of Fort Hare, South Africa

Full Text:

PDF (168KB)

Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: Nurses are key stakeholders in health promotion and obesity management, yet a high-risk group for obesity development. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of abdominal obesity among primary health care professional nurses (PHCPNs) in Eastern Cape, South Africa.
Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 203 PHCPNs conveniently selected across 41 primary health care facilities in Eastern Cape, South Africa. The WHO STEPwise questionnaire was used for data collection. Abdominal obesity was defined according to the WHO criteria as a waist circumference ≥ 94 cm for men and ≥ 80 cm for women or waist-to-hip ratio ≥ 0.90 in men and ≥ 0.85 in women; and a waist-to-height ratio of > 0.50.
Results: The prevalence of abdominal obesity ranged from 50%, to 87% to 90%, using waist-to-hip ratio, waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio, respectively. Age, gender and duration of practice were significantly associated with abdominal obesity. After adjusting for potential confounders, only age > 30 years (OR = 6.7; 95% CI = 2.4–18.7; p < 0.001) and female sex (AOR = 7.9; 95% CI = 2.4–18.7; p < 0.001) were independent predictors of obesity.
Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of abdominal obesity among PHCPNs in Eastern Cape, South Africa, which was associated with female sex and ageing. This constitutes a potential risk for the healthcare workforce of the province and might be an impediment to adequate conveyance to patients of health education on healthy weight management by the affected nurses. There is an urgent need for appropriate workplace health policies targeted towards the promotion of physical activities, healthy lifestyle and ultimately weight reduction among this group.


Keywords

abdominal obesity; health promotion; nurses; obesity; prevalence; South Africa

Metrics

Total abstract views: 476
Total article views: 181


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.