Original Research

Early removal of etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant at a community health centre in Pretoria

Dikonketjo M.P. Moeti, Indiran Govender, Tombo Bongongo
South African Family Practice | Vol 64, No 1 : Part 3| a5407 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/safp.v64i1.5407 | © 2022 Dikonketjo M.P. Moeti, Indiran Govender, Tombo Bongongo | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 09 September 2021 | Published: 07 July 2022

About the author(s)

Dikonketjo M.P. Moeti, Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa
Indiran Govender, Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa
Tombo Bongongo, Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

Background: The etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant offers efficacy for three years, but some women remove it earlier than prescribed. This study discusses factors associated with the early removal of these implants at a Pretoria community health centre between 01 January 2020 to 30 June 2020.

Methods: A cross-sectional study using a piloted and researcher assistant-administered questionnaire.

Results: Of the 124 participants who removed their etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant earlier than prescribed, most were single, unemployed, in the age group 30–39 years, Christian, with secondary level education and with parity one or more. Etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant pre-insertion counselling was given to all participants, most of whom had not previously used contraceptives. Those participants with previous contraceptive use had used injectables. Long-term contraception was the main reason for getting the etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant. Most participants did not attend post-insertion counselling. Heavy bleeding was the most common side effect and reason for early removal. Fifty-one participants kept the etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant in for a longer period of 12–23 months. From participants’ responses, it seems that Etonogestrel implants may be offered from as early as 15–20 years of age.

Conclusion: Women having etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implants removed early at a Pretoria community health centre tended to be young, single, unemployed, Christian, with a secondary level education and with parity one or more. All participants attended the etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant pre-insertion counselling services but not the post-counselling services. Heavy bleeding was the main reason for the early removal of the etonogestrel subcutaneous contraceptive implant.


Keywords

early removal; etonogestrel; subcutaneous contraceptive; implant; Pretoria; community health centre; weight gain; vaginal bleeding

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1817
Total article views: 2033


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.