Original Research

Compliance of medical practitioners with diabetic treatment guidelines in West Rand, Gauteng

Nneka J. Ohanson, Deidré Pretorius
South African Family Practice | Vol 65, No 1 : Part 2| a5633 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/safp.v65i1.5633 | © 2023 Nneka J. Ohanson, Deidré Pretorius | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 September 2022 | Published: 23 March 2023

About the author(s)

Nneka J. Ohanson, Division of Family Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Deidré Pretorius, Division of Family Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Diabetes mellitus is increasing globally and is associated with multiple complications. Guidelines have been formulated to standardise care among people living with diabetes mellitus (DM), but research shows poor compliance with treatment guidelines. The aim of this study was to assess how well healthcare practitioners in a district hospital in Gauteng complied with the most recent diabetic treatment guideline, Society for Endocrinology Metabolism and Diabetes South Africa (SEMDSA) 2017.

Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional review of patient record living with diabetes was done. This study was conducted in the out-patient department of Dr Yusuf Dadoo hospital in the West Rand, Gauteng. A total of 323 records of patients seen from August 2019 to December 2019 were reviewed, and some of the basic variables were assessed according to the most recent diabetic treatment guidelines SEMDSA 2017.

Results: Files were audited in four categories: comorbidities, examinations, investigations and the presence of complications. Six monthly glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was assessed in 40 (12.4%), annual creatinine assessed in 179 (55.4%) and lipogram in 154 (47.7%) of patients. More than 70% of patients had uncontrolled glycaemia and two people were screened for erectile dysfunction.

Conclusion: Monitoring and control parameters were infrequently done as per guideline recommendations. The resultant effects were poor glycaemic control and thus numerous complications.

Contribution: Targeted strategies to improve medical practitioner compliance to guidelines including further research to study factors associated with poor compliance with guidelines are needed to improve the overall care of people living with DM in the West Rand and thus minimise the risk of complications among patients in the district.


Keywords

compliance; diabetes; medical practitioners; treatment guidelines; Society for Endocrinology Metabolism and Diabetes South Africa (SEMDSA) guidelines

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