Original Research

Diabetes Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices in adults with type 2 diabetes at primary health care clinics in Kimberley South Africa

Moses Alenbalu, Chika K. Egenasi, Wilhelm J. Steinberg, Omololu Aluko
South African Family Practice | Vol 66, No 1 : Part 1| a5838 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/safp.v66i1.5838 | © 2024 Moses Alenbalu, Chika K. Egenasi, Wilhelm J. Steinberg, Omololu Aluko | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 22 September 2023 | Published: 29 January 2024

About the author(s)

Moses Alenbalu, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Chika K. Egenasi, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Wilhelm J. Steinberg, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Omololu Aluko, Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common non-communicable disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality globally. It poses a huge public health and economic challenge. People with diabetes need to have adequate knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) to prevent complications from diabetes. This study aims to evaluate the KAP towards diabetes among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients attending primary healthcare clinics in Kimberley.

Methods: A cross-sectional analytical, quantitative questionnaire-based study was done using a convenient sampling method in Sol Plaatje Municipality, Kimberley, Northern Cape.

Results: A total of 363 type 2 diabetic patients took part in the study. Most of the participants (62.0%) were females. Most had good knowledge (67.5%), while 64.5% of the participants showed good attitudes towards diabetes. However, only 35.8% of the participants had good practices towards diabetes. There was a significant association between the participant’s level of education and (1) knowledge and (2) practice, with p-values of 0.002 and 0.0075, respectively. No significant association was found between the participant’s level of education and attitudes towards diabetes (p = 0.2416).

Conclusion: This study demonstrated good diabetes-related knowledge and attitudes but inadequate practices among participants. Educational programmes to assist patients with diabetes to improve their practice towards diabetes should be encouraged and implemented.

Contribution: This study will help to create awareness of the need for people with diabetes to improve their practices towards diabetes.


Keywords

diabetes mellitus; knowledge; attitude; practice; Kimberley; South Africa

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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