Original Research

Knowledge, attitudes and practices on diabetic foot care among nurses in Kimberley, South Africa

Labala G. Mafusi, Chika K. Egenasi, Wilhelm J. Steinberg, Mathew O. Benedict, Talat Habib, Melvin Harmse, Cornel van Rooyen
South African Family Practice | Vol 66, No 1 : Part 3| a5935 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/safp.v66i1.5935 | © 2024 Labala G. Mafusi, Chika K. Egenasi, Wilhelm J. Steinberg, Mathew O. Benedict, Talat Habib, Melvin Harmse, Cornel van Rooyen | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 19 February 2024 | Published: 25 June 2024

About the author(s)

Labala G. Mafusi, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa; and, Department of Family Medicine, Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital, Kimberley, South Africa
Chika K. Egenasi, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Wilhelm J. Steinberg, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Mathew O. Benedict, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Talat Habib, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa; and, Department of Family Medicine, Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital, Kimberley, South Africa
Melvin Harmse, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa; and, Department of Family Medicine, Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital, Kimberley, South Africa
Cornel van Rooyen, Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Science, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Diabetic foot is a dangerous complication of diabetes and can lead to high morbidity and mortality. As essential team members of the healthcare system, nurses play an important role in diabetic foot management and are indispensable in patients’ education to prevent diabetic foot. The study assessed nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding diabetic foot care in Sol Plaatje primary health care centres in the Northern Cape: Sol Plaatje’s 14 district municipality clinics, Kimberley, Northern Cape.

Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional analytical study. A questionnaire assessed nurses’ knowledge, practices and attitudes towards diabetic foot care in the above setting.

Results: A total of 128 professionals, enrolled and auxiliary nurses who are providing primary care to patients within the 14 clinics in the Sol-Plaatje sub-district were recruited for the study. Hundred and five participants completed the self-administered questionnaires. The majority (95%) were females and 58.1% knew that South African Diabetic Foot Guidelines existed, while 57.7% had read them. About 57% did not know about the 60-s diabetic foot screening tool, and 67% did not know the 10 g monofilament test. Approximately 29.8% had never attended a class on diabetic foot care and 85.6% required training on diabetic foot care.

Conclusion: This study revealed that the majority of nurses working in the Sol-Plaatje sub-district primary health care centres are knowledgeable of the diabetic foot guidelines for primary care. However, there is a need for ongoing education on diabetic foot care.

Contribution: The study results will help improve nurses’ awareness of the importance of diabetic foot care.


Keywords

diabetic foot; nurses; Sol Plaatje; knowledge; attitudes; practices; guidelines; clinics

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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