Research Articles

Patient satisfaction with medical consultations among adults attending Mulago hospital assessment centre

Angella Kabatooroa, Fred Ndoboli, Jane Namatovu
South African Family Practice | Vol 58, No 3 : May/June| a5665 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/safp.v58i3.5665 | © 2022 Angella Kabatooroa, Fred Ndoboli, Jane Namatovu | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 17 November 2022 | Published: 01 May 2016

About the author(s)

Angella Kabatooroa, Department of Family Medicine, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda
Fred Ndoboli, Department of Family Medicine, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda, Uganda
Jane Namatovu, Department of Family Medicine, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda

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Abstract

Background: Patient satisfaction is known to positively influence patients’ compliance with medical advice. In Africa, and specifically Uganda, this interaction has rarely been put to scientific inquiry. This study aimed to determine the level of patient satisfaction and identify factors influencing satisfaction with medical consultations among adults attending Mulago Assessment Centre.

Methods: This was a quantitative descriptive cross-sectional study where 384 respondents were interviewed using a structured questionnaire adapted from the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS-21) with a four-point Likert scale. Patient satisfaction was measured using four dimensions namely: information provision, clinicians’ communication skills, perceived consulting time and patient’s confidence in the clinician. Respondents’ mean scores were categorised as satisfied or dissatisfied. Multivariate linear regression analysis assessed the effect of independent variables on the regression factor score of the dependent variable. Significance level was set at p < 0.05. Final data analysis was done using STATA version 11.0.

Results: Of the sample, 53.9% were satisfied with the medical consultation. Patients’ average scores showed lowest satisfaction for information provision (2.7 points) compared with communication skills (3.22 points), patient confidence in the clinicians (3.22 points) and consultation time (3.05 points). Being older, employed, living further away from the health centre and frequently visiting the centre were positively associated with patient satisfaction.

Conclusions: Patient satisfaction was largely affected by interpersonal factors. This highlights the need for training of clinicians on the importance of adequate information provision, good communication skills and technical competences like thorough examination of patients and relieving worries about illness during the consultation.


Keywords

consultations; patient satisfaction; patient–clinician interaction

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